Yogurt defeats h.pylori

Yogurt defeats h.pylori. Yogurt's good bacteria are your knights in shining armor
Yogurt defeats h.pylori. Yogurt’s good bacteria are your knights in shining armor

You may not know it, but h.pylori is waging a war on your health. It burrows into your stomach lining where it lowers acid production and causes B12 malabsorption, peptic ulcers and ultimately stomach cancer. The good news is, Yogurt defeats h.pylori.

h.pylori has been thriving and delighting in our almost total ignorance about it, while it deals out illness and death. But h.pylori’s met its match in yogurt. Yogurt defeats h.pylori.

A 2008 study from the Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland showed that Lactobacillus microorganisms, the good bacteria in yogurt, hinder, retard, inhibit and impede the growth of h.pylori.

Apparently the researchers were so excited by their findings that they didn’t want to say, “yogurt stops h.pylori,” and leave it at that.

By hindering, retarding, inhibiting and impeding the growth of h.pylori in your stomach, yogurt defeats h.pylori and rescues your vitamin B12 levels. h.pylori, you see, is a leading cause of B12 malabsorption.

It’s a big deal that yogurt defeats h.pylori

Healthy vitamin B12 absorption helps you have healthy vitamin B12 levels. The upshot is, your memory, balance, mood, and red blood cell health improve.

Yogurt, and its good bacteria, help you feel less stressed and even reduce asthma attacks.

When you have less h.pylori in your stomach you have less chance of getting peptic ulcers and stomach cancer. Less h.pylori helps you get more magnesium from food, as well as and vitamin B12. So, it’s a big deal that yogurt defeats h.pylori.

Korean urn with blue dragon art - Korean Rice Wine

Speaking of good bacteria

A friend on Twitter was talking about his Makgeolli. He’s in Korea and makes a traditional rice wine called Makgeolli. He said it has more good bacteria than yogurt, so I had to give it a try.

To my surprise Makgeolli’s easy to make and tastes really good with the dried strawberries and other fruit I added. I’m not sure what it tastes like straight.

I made and drank Makgeolli all winter. I even got a little wine heater. Apparently Sake is often served warm with the help of these tealight sets.

Although yogurt defeats h.pylori, it turns out that it’s more fattening than Korean rice wine. In large part that’s because I consumed so much of it. Be that as it may, in the final analysis, both yogurt and Korean rice wine have proven to be excellent sources of living good bacteria.

Yogurt reduces asthma symptoms

After I read articles about yogurt reducing asthma symptoms I ate the recommended daily 6 ounces. In three months I had few asthma attacks. Later still I had none.

When my son was little and we lived in London, we had serious asthma and went to an Irish doctor. I forget his name, except that he said it translated as, “Blue Prince.”

Our Blue Prince doctor said asthma was related to stress. At the time the Home Office was threatening to put me in prison for six months prior to deportation for being an alien, or in other words, your basic illegal immigrant.

I was reminded of our Irish doctor today when I read a new study of probiotic bacteria found in yogurt. The study says  the Lactobacillus bacteria significantly regulate emotional behavior via GABA receptors in the brain.

For the study, Javier Bravo at University College Cork in Ireland, fed normal lab mice a diet full of probiotics, then tested for significant behavioral changes.

When probiotic-fed mice were stressed by being dropped into a pool of water, they were less anxious and released less stress hormone. That’s what reminded me of our Blue Prince doctor.

When researchers snipped the nerve connecting gut to brain it stopped the changes.

e.coli, salmonella, listeria, cancer, candida and their nemesis, Yogurt

Apparently yogurt defeats h.pylori and also fights e.coli, salmonella, listeria, cancer and candida.

In 2000, the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition published Immunologic effects of yogurt. The study dealt with the immune mechanisms by which yogurt and lactic acid bacteria (like lactobacillus) have therapeutic and preventive effects on diseases such as cancer, infection, gastrointestinal disorders, and asthma.

Lactobacillus
Good, and VERY helpful Lactobacillus micro-organisms

The primary way yogurt stimulates immunity is by changing your gastrointestinal micro-ecology. That is, yogurt’s Lactobacillus (LAB) suppresses growth of pathogenic bacteria in the intestines. This reduces infection and heightens anticarcinogenic effects.

The amount of immune stimulation is related to the amount of contact with tissue. To have contact the LAB must survive gastric acid. Some strains of LAB are better at surviving than others. Within the Lactobacillus genus, L. acidophilus is more resistant to gastric juice than is conventional lactic culture, L. bulgaricus, and is more resistant than S. thermophilus. Of the 4 Bifidobacterium species studied (B. infantis, B. bifidum, B. adolescentis, and B. longum), B. longum is the most resistant to gastric acid.

When you eat yogurt the LAB that survive GI gastric acid adhere to epithelial cells in the wall of your GI tract and stimulate the lymphoid tissue which then produces more cytokine, phagocytic activity, antibodies, better T cell function, and better natural killer (NK) cell activity.

This multi faceted immune enhancement reduces cancer, GI disorders, and allergic symptoms.

Definitions and Summary

But, what are cytokines? Cytokines are protein mediators produced by immune cells. Cytokines are involved in cell growth, immunity, and inflammation.

What’s phagocytic activity? Phagocytic activity is the killing of microbes including bacterial pathogens to include Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhimurium, Listeria monocytogenes, and Candida albicans.

Well, that’s pretty impressive, isn’t it? It sounds as if we need phagocytic activity to protect us from e.coli salmonella, listeria and candida.  Who knew?

Yes, yogurt changes the ecology of your gastrointestinal system with tremendous health benefits, but yogurt is not a cure all. It is an excellent preventative measure given that the main functions of the immune system are to eliminate invading viruses and foreign micro-organisms, to rid the body of damaged tissue, and to destroy neoplasms (abnormal tissue formations, as for instance tissue characteristic of cancer) and, indeed, to destroy cancer in the body.

Abundant evidence shows that specific bacterial species in yogurt have exactly the powerful antipathogenic and anti-inflammatory properties that you need.

Bacteria have feelings?

Cleve Backster studied the reactions of plants by attaching polygraph electrodes to them. One night he discovered, with the help of a dracaena plant, that bacteria in yogurt have feelings. His Primary Perceptions work is fascinating and enlightening.

Click here to watch video

Other Pages on Yogurt:

Easily make your own yogurt

Increasing the B12 content of your yogurt

Yogurt fights cancer

Smile Making cow video

1/29/2014 ~ Here is a smile making video of cows which were scheduled for slaugher since their calf bearing and milk giving years of highest production were over. But, instead they were given a grassy pasture. Watch as they literally jump for joy! Imagine how much heathier milk is, from happy cows.

The above video always brings tears to my eyes.

I think that if I can just keep Wells Fargo from taking my home and garden, I will be as happy as those cows.

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Yogurt defeats h.pylori
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Yogurt defeats h.pylori
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You may not know it, but h.pylori is waging a war on your health. It burrows into your stomach lining where it lowers acid production and causes B12 malabsorption, peptic ulcers and ultimately stomach cancer. The good news is, Yogurt defeats h.pylori.
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Health Boundaries
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